JUBA YOUTH 5 short films by South Sudanese filmmakers about growing up
in their country and the hopes and dreams of young people (2013)

Slide - Mahzouba Maya Faal, The Gambia “In Africa, there are a lot of stories that don’t get told. And many voices that don’t get heard.”
Slide - Matilda Dogbatsey, Ghana “I don’t have a university degree. My WELTFILME certificate is my professional qualification.” Slide - G-Othello Zordyu, Liberia “In Liberia, there’s no major TV station, no local film industry and, above all, no educational opportunities for young people to learn film. I want to inform and train the next generation.” Slide - Luther N. Mafalleh, Liberia “WELTFILME gave me the confidence to do things
in my own way.”
Slide - Luther N. Mafalleh, Liberia “Film and television are such powerful tools for drawing
the public’s attention to
important social issues.”
Slide - Luther N. Mafalleh, Liberia “WELTFILME has opened doors
for me that I didn’t even know existed.”
Slide - Fatou Ndure, The Gambia “The first days of the workshop were such an amazing experience. There was so much to take in, so many things to learn.” Slide - Alex Asare, Ghana “WELTFILME — they’re just really good. They’re wonderful people. And they’ve got to keep doing this.” Slide - Alex Asare, Ghana “Most of the media focuses only on the ugly parts of Africa — on war and disasters. I want people to see the real Africa.” Slide - Matilda Dogbatsey, Ghana “My training with WELTFILME helped me, as a woman, to assert myself in a male-dominated profession.”

COME, I’LL SHOW YOU

THE YOUNG PEOPLE OF SOUTH SUDAN

The JUBA YOUTH project took place in South Sudan in 2013 — two years after the state, located in Central Africa, gained independence. In five short films, South Sudanese filmmakers tell stories of what it’s like to grow up in their country.

 

The majority of South Sudan’s population is younger than 18 years of age. What desires and hopes do they have, not only for themselves but also for their young republic? How do they, as young people, make ends meet or find a career? How might social assistance work, even in this impoverished region? What role do old traditions play in these modern times?

Questions like these were explored in documentary and fictional films, which were shown in cinemas, special screenings, and on television in both South Sudan and Germany.

 

All JUBA YOUTH filmmakers were honoured with the Special Film-Maker Award at the XXVIII Black International Cinema Berlin Festival in 2013.

COME, I’LL SHOW YOU

THE YOUNG PEOPLE OF SOUTH SUDAN

The JUBA YOUTH project took place in South Sudan in 2013 — two years after the state, located in Central Africa, gained independence. In five short films, South Sudanese filmmakers tell stories of what it’s like to grow up in their country.

  The majority of South Sudan’s population is younger than 18 years of age. What desires and hopes do they have, not only for themselves but also for their young republic? How do they, as young people, make ends meet or find a career? How might social assistance work, even in this impoverished region? What role do old traditions play in these modern times? Questions like these were explored in documentary and fictional films, which were shown in cinemas, special screenings, and on television in both South Sudan and Germany.

All JUBA YOUTH filmmakers were honoured with the Special Film-Maker Award at the XXVIII Black International Cinema Berlin Festival in 2013.

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