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TENSIONS AMONG THE YOUNG

When the Republic of South Sudan gained independence, South Sudanese families returned from their exile in other African countries and around the globe. Children and young people who grew up in the most different cultures — some liberal, some conservative — are now confronted with the traditions in their country of origin. Which rules should be followed, and which changed? Conflicts between different ways of life and moral values are inevitable. How are young people managing to foster tolerance amidst such divisions?

COME, I’LL SHOW YOU

TENSIONS AMONG THE YOUNG

When the Republic of South Sudan gained independence, South Sudanese families returned from their exile in other African countries and around the globe. Children and young people who grew up in the most different cultures — some liberal, some conservative — are now confronted with the traditions in their country of origin. Which rules should be followed, and which changed? Conflicts between different ways of life and moral values are inevitable. How are young people managing to foster tolerance amidst such divisions?

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FILMEMAKERS

Director Mary Kadi Manoah
Director of Photography Hakim George
Editor York Ezra,  Christian R. Timmann
Sound Jana König
Assistant Production Manager Isaac Ngobi
   
   
   
   

COME, I’LL SHOW YOU THE

FILMEMAKERS

Director

Mary Kadi Manoah

Director of Photography

Hakim George

Editor

York Ezra,  Christian R. Timmann

Sound

Jana König

Assistant Production Manager

Isaac Ngobi

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FILM INFORMATION

Type Fiction
Length 7:14 min.
Language Arabic / English with English or German subtitles
Country of origin South Sudan
Year 2013
   
   
   
   

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FILM INFORMATION

Filmart

Spielfilm

Filmlänge

7:14 Min.

Sprache

Arabisch / Englisch mit englischen oder deutschen Untertiteln

Entstehungsland

Südsudan

Entstehungsjahr

2013

COME, I’LL SHOW YOU THE COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

SOUTH SUDAN

South Sudan (officially the Republic of South Sudan) gained its independence from the Republic of Sudan in the north in 2011 and is the most recently recognised sovereign state in Africa. The country borders Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Central African Republic. The capital city is Juba. English is the official language, but Arabic and many other languages are also spoken.
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A struggle for governmental power led to a civil war between 2013 and 2018, the effects of which can still be felt. About two thirds of the approximately 13 million inhabitants cannot read or write, and more than half of the population lives below the poverty line.
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Journalists in South Sudan regularly face threats, assault and intimidation efforts. Criticism of the government and its agencies is poorly tolerated. Since fighting began in 2013, the situation has worsened: many journalists were forced to flee from the violence, and many news outlets had to cease operations. On the 2020 World Press Freedom Index published by Reporters without Borders, South Sudan ranked 138th out of 180 countries.

COME, I’LL SHOW YOU THE COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

SOUTH SUDAN

South Sudan (officially the Republic of South Sudan) gained its independence from the Republic of Sudan in the north in 2011 and is the most recently recognised sovereign state in Africa. The country borders Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Central African Republic. The capital city is Juba. English is the official language, but Arabic and many other languages are also spoken.
>/br>
A struggle for governmental power led to a civil war between 2013 and 2018, the effects of which can still be felt. About two thirds of the approximately 13 million inhabitants cannot read or write, and more than half of the population lives below the poverty line.
>/br>
Journalists in South Sudan regularly face threats, assault and intimidation efforts. Criticism of the government and its agencies is poorly tolerated. Since fighting began in 2013, the situation has worsened: many journalists were forced to flee from the violence, and many news outlets had to cease operations. On the 2020 World Press Freedom Index published by Reporters without Borders, South Sudan ranked 138th out of 180 countries.